Contents tagged with Windows Server 2008

  • Windows Server Solutions Best Practices Analyzer 1.0

    Posted by sumeethevans on March 3 2011, 6:45 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008.

    Windows Server Solutions Best Practices Analyzer 1.0 (Windows Server Solutions BPA) is a diagnostic tool that is built on the Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analyzer (MBCA) technology. Windows Server Solutions BPA scans a computer that is running the Windows server solutions software, and compares the existing server settings to a predefined set of recommended best practices.Windows Server Solutions BPA performs the following tasks:
    • Gathers information about a server that is running Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Windows Small Business Server 2011 Essentials, Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials, or Windows Multipoint Server 2011
    • Determines if the server settings comply with a set of best practices that are recommended by Microsoft
    • Provides a report of the scan results, which identifies variances from the recommended best practices
    • Identifies conditions that may lead to problems with the server
    • Recommends solutions to potential problems

    Download At Source

  • Must-Have articles for Troubleshooting RemoteFX issues in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1

    Posted by sumeethevans on February 18 2011, 9:09 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2008.

    As I mentioned last week, Service Pack 1 for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 is in the midst of full public release. One of the new features of SP1 is RemoteFX, which I plan to post about soon. In the mean time, if you are running SP1 and using RemoteFX, please look to the following articles for some known issues you might run into:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2501763

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2501816

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2505030

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2506391

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2505694

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2506417

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2506434

    Continue At Source

  • Microsoft Deployment Kit 2010 Update 1 is RTM

    Posted by RayC on July 8 2010, 4:11 PM. Posted in Windows XP, Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, Windows Deployment, Windows 2008 R2, Windows 7, Office 2010, windows.

    If you’re making the move to Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and/or Office 2010, you need tools and guidance to help you through the process.  Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) 2010, a free Solution Accelerator, is designed to fill that need.

    The latest MDT 2010 Update 1 release, now available for download, offers something for everyone:

    For System Center Configuration Manager 2007 customers:

    • New “User Driven Installation” deployment method. An easy-to-use UDI Wizard allows users to initiate and customize an OS deployment on their PCs that’s tailored to their individual needs.
    • Support for Configuration Manager R3 “Prestaged Media.” For those deploying Windows 7 and Office 2010 along with new PCs, a custom OS image can easily be loaded in the factory and then customized once deployed. 

     

    For Lite Touch Installation:

    • Support for Office 2010. Easily configure Office 2010 installation and deployment settings through the Deployment Workbench and integration with the Office Customization Tool.
    • Improved driver importing. All drivers are inspected during the import process to accurately determine what platforms they really support, avoiding common inaccuracies that can cause deployment issues.

     More info at source

     Download the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 Update 1 here.

  • Best Practices Analyzer Updates for Server 2008 R2

    Posted by sumeethevans on April 29 2010, 7:54 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2008.

    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for HYPER-V for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB977238) You can use Hyper-V Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server that is running the Hyper-V role, and help identify configurations that do not comply with the best practices of Microsoft for this role.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for DHCP Server for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB977236) You can use DHCP Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server that is running the DHCP role and help identify configurations that do not comply with the best practices from Microsoft for this role.<o:p></o:p>
    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for Network Policy and Access Services for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (NPAS) (KB977239) You can use the Network Policy and Access Services update for Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server that is running one or more of following the role services: Network Policy Server, Health Registration Authority, and Routing and Remote Access Service.<o:p></o:p>
    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for File Services for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB981111) You can use File Services Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server that is running the File Services role and one or more of following role services: DFS Namespaces, DFS Replication, File Server, File Server Resource Manager, Services for Network File System.<o:p></o:p>
    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for Active Directory Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB981391) You can use Active Directory Rights Management Services Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server that is running the AD RMS role and help identify configurations that do not comply with the best practices of Microsoft for this role.<o:p></o:p>
    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for Windows Server Update Services for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB981390) You can use the Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) update for Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server that is running WSUS.<o:p></o:p>
    Update for Best Practices Analyzer for Application Server for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB981392) You can use the Application Server update for Best Practices Analyzer to scan a server <o:p></o:p>

    Download At Source

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 to Phase Out Itanium

    Posted by bink on April 5 2010, 10:49 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2008 R2.

    Windows Server 2008 R2 will be the last version of Windows Server to support the Intel Itanium architecture.  SQL Server 2008 R2 and Visual Studio 2010 are also the last versions to support Itanium. 

    Current support for Itanium remains unchanged.  Each of these products represent the state of the art of their respective product lines.  Each fully support Itanium, support the recently-released Itanium 9300 (“Tukwila”) processor, and Microsoft’s support for these products will continue – following the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy.  Mainstream support for Windows Server 2008 for Itanium-Based Systems (and R2) will end, in accordance with that policy, on July 9, 2013, while extended support will continue until July 10, 2018.  That’s 8 more years of support.

    Why the change?  The natural evolution of the x86 64-bit (“x64”) architecture has led to the creation of processors and servers which deliver the scalability and reliability needed for today’s “mission-critical” workloads.  Just this week, both Intel and AMD have released new high core-count processors, and servers with 8 or more x64 processors have now been announced by a full dozen server manufacturers.  Such servers contain 64 to 96 processor cores, with more on the horizon.

    Windows Server 2008 R2 was designed to support the business-critical capabilities these processors and servers make available.  It supports up to 256 logical processors (cores or hyper-threading units), so it’s ready for the ever-increasing number of cores.  It supports technologies such as Intel’s Machine Check Architecture, which allow for the detection and correction of bit-level hardware errors.  And NEC just published a new world record TPC-E benchmark for online transaction processing of 3,141.76 tpsE on a system with 8 x64 processors – a result more than 50% higher than the previous record.

    Microsoft will continue to focus on the x64 architecture, and it’s new business-critical role, while we continue to support Itanium customers for the next 8 years as this transition is completed.

     

    Windows Server Division WebLog  Windows Server 2008 R2 to Phase Out Itanium

  • Microsoft URL Rewrite Module 2.0 for IIS 7 - RC

    Posted by bink on March 5 2010, 2:42 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows 2008 R2.

    URL Rewrite Module 2.0 provides a rule-based rewriting mechanism for changing requested URL’s before they get processed by web server and for modifying response content before it gets served to HTTP clients.

    Microsoft URL Rewrite Module 2.0 for IIS 7 RC is an incremental release that includes all the features from version 1.1, and adds support for rewriting of request and response headers as well as response content. More specifically, it can be used to:

    • Replace the URLs generated by a web application in the response HTML with a more user friendly and search engine friendly equivalent.
    • Modify the links in the HTML markup generated by a web application behind a reverse proxy.
    • Fix up the content of any HTTP response by using regular expression pattern matching.
    • Modify HTTP request headers and IIS server variables.
    • Modify HTTP response headers
    The installation package includes several additional components and hotfixes required by URL Rewrite Module 2.0 Beta. Refer to the KB articles for the hotfixes to get more details. In order to apply the hotfixes correctly without restarting the server, it is recommended that the WAS service is stopped before installing URL Rewrite Module 2.0 Beta. The following hotfixes will be installed with URL Rewrite Module 2.0 Beta:
    • Update for IIS 7.0 FastCGI module (KB 954946);
    • Hotfix for IIS 7.0 SetUri function (KB 949172)
    • Hotfix for ASP.NET System.Web.dll (KB 957660

     

    Download details URL Rewrite Module 2.0 for IIS 7 - RC (x64)

    Microsoft URL Rewrite Module 2.0 for IIS 7 - RC (x86)

  • Everything you need to know about DHCP as a Systems Administrator

    Posted by Netanel Ben-Shushan on February 23 2010, 1:36 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows Fundamentals, Learning.

    By: Netanel Ben-Shushan, CSA/JNCIA-SSL/MCP/MCSA/MCSE/MCTS/MCITP

    Abstract

    This article will help you to learn everything that you need to know as a systems administrator (or SysAdmin) about this protocol and what can you do with him.

     

    What's DHCP? And why it's recommended to use it?

    Imagine that you're working as a SysAdmin for a large company with 500 desktop computers; you need to set to each desktop computer IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, DNS servers, and other network settings. How could you do that?

    If you'll try to perform this task manually you're probably going to waste a lot of time on sitting on each computer 5-10 minutes, beside time, you can for example accidently enter wrong IP address to few clients, or to type the same IP address to few clients too.

    In order to solve these "problems" you can use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (or DHCP) in your network.

    DHCP allows you manage the networks' IP addresses scopes and other TCP/IP settings like DNS, Default Gateway, etc. from central place, this central place called DHCP server. Beside the management, if there's any problem you don't need to run between your clients, you just need to connect to your server and to check the DHCP settings, as I mentioned – the DHCP works from central place, so if there's a problem, it's probably from the server, so you know where to go in case of problem and your saving time.

    The DHCP server can provide easily IP addresses to clients automatically so you don't even need to configure and set options in the client side, all you need is to setup DHCP server, configure scope options and some other TCP/IP settings in the server side and that's it. You can provide to your clients IP addresses from the selected range that you've configured and some other TCP/IP options.

    Note: DHCP in my opinion can called "The next generation of BOOTP", because the BOOTP came first before the DHCP, and today we're using BOOTP in order to deploy operating systems by booting from the network. Beside this, DHCP was developed in order to support in large networks – something that BOOTP can't provide.

     

    How DHCP works?

    Without entering to the related technical information (DORA process) the DHCP client request from the DHCP server IP address for a while, the length of time that the DHCP client can use the dynamic IP address that the DHCP server provided can be called lease, just like the name: lease means that the client "rent" an IP address for a specific time from the DHCP server, if the client want to continue using the specific IP address the client needs to re-assign the address by renew the lease, this will happen before the expiration time of the lease if the client is still in the network.

    More in depth, the DHCP service works by using the DORA (Discover, Offer, Request and Acknowledgment) process (you can trace on the whole process using a network monitor utility):

    1. DHCPDISCOVER – The client broadcast a DHCPDISCOVER packet in order to locate a DHCP server in the network, in some cases that the DHCP server isn't in the same subnet of the client, you'll need to configure in your network devices (usually routers) a DHCP Relay Agent, in order to transfer the DHCPDISCOVER packet to the DHCP server.

    2. DHCPOFFER – The DHCP server broadcast a DHCPOFFER packet to the client which includes an offer to use a unique IP address for the client.

    3. DHCPREQUEST – The client broadcast a DHCPREQUEST packet to the DHCP server with an answer, and "asks" from the server to "rent" the unique address that the server offer to her.

    4. DHCPACK – The DHCP server broadcast a DHCPACK packet to the client, in this packet the server acknowledge the request from the client to use the IP address, and provide to the client the IP address lease and other details such as DNS servers, default gateway, etc. if the server cannot provide the requested IP address or from some reasons the address is not valid the server sends DHCPNACK packet in stand of DHCPACK, more information about DHCPNACK is under the specific subject – DHCPNACK.

     

    everything_you_need_to_know_about_dhcp_1 

    Note: DHCP service uses port 67/UDP in the DHCP server, and 68/UDP at the DHCP clients.

     

    It's recommended to check that your firewall doesn't block these ports in order to able the DHCP server and clients to communicate, and also check that your network devices supports DHCP Relay Agent in case that some of your clients are in different physical subnet.

    In some cases you'll notice another DHCP messages like these:

    1. DHCPDECLINE – If the client recognizes that the IP address that the DHCP server offer to her in use, the client will generate a new request to another IP address (in the DHCPREQUEST step).

    2. DHCPRELEASE – This message is commonly in use when the client "give up" and release IP address.

    3. DHCPRENEW – This is the request packet to renew and continue "renting" the IP address lease.

    4. DHCPINFORM – The DHCPINFORM is packet that the client send to the DHCP server in order to get more details from the server, for example DHCPINFORM can be send in order to locate another DHCP servers in the network.

     

    DHCPNACK

    The DHCPNACK or Negative Acknowledgment is a packet that the server sends if the IP address is not available in stand of DHCPACK (in use on other client for example) or the address is no longer valid. In case of DHCPNACK the client must restart the lease process in order to get an IP address.

     

    DHCP Scopes, Exclude and Reservation

    DHCP Scope is a range of IP addresses that you configure in your DHCP server as range of addresses that designed for distribution to the clients.

    For example, if you set a scope with a range from 10.0.0.100-10.0.0.200, you can easily provide only from this range IP addresses to your clients.

    You can also create more than one scope, but it's recommended to check that your scopes aren't duplicating one with each other's. At the scope creation process you can add some more TCP/IP parameters such as subnet mask, IP addresses lease time, router (default gateway), DNS servers, etc. so when the clients gets the IP addresses they'll get also the other parameters from the scope.

    In some cases, you'll need to prevent the client using some addresses, for example if your scope is from 10.0.0.1 up to 10.0.0.100, and your servers using 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.10, you can exclude these IP addresses from the scope and exclude the DHCP to distribute them to the clients, in most of the DHCP servers this option called exclude.

    Reservation is a great option if you're planning to provide specific dynamic IP address from the DHCP server to unique DHCP client. If for example in the 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.100 scope you want to provide for specific client a unique address that will be always of the client, you can easily set reservation for the client using a unique identifier – the MAC address, the MAC of Media Access Control is a unique hexadecimal physical address for network adapters.

     

    DHCP & DNS

    When you're installing DHCP server you can configure the DHCP server to set DNS updates to any DNS server that support dynamic updates. More information about the combination between DHCP and DNS you can find right here.

     

    Active Directory & DHCP Servers

    In Microsoft Windows Server with Active Directory you need to authorize your server in order to work with the DHCP service.

    In the past you could install few DHCP servers – as you wish, this action occurs problems like server crashing, etc.

    In the new Windows 2000 Server/Server 2003/2008 you must authorize your server in order to start the DHCP server, if there's an authorized DHCP server in the Active Directory environment and a non-authorized server trying to start the DHCP service in order to distribute IP address, the server will failed in this task and the DHCP service in the local computer will stop.

     

    DHCP Relay Agent

    DHCP Relay Agent is any kind of host (usually a router or server) that listen to DHCP/BOOTP broadcast from clients on subnets without local DHCP servers.

    The DHCP Relay Agent forwards the packets from the clients and the DHCP server that sitting on different physical subnets to each other in order to supply 'connection' between the DHCP Server to the clients, and opposite (from the clients to the server).

    everything_you_need_to_know_about_dhcp_2

     

    In conclusion

    Using DHCP service can easily help you as a System/Network Administrator to manage you clients by assigning, tracking and re-assigning IP addresses.

     

    About the author

    Netanel Ben-Shushan is an IT Consultant & Trainer from Israel, who works mainly with Microsoft, networking and information security systems. He's the creator of www.ben-shushan.net, a personal website in Hebrew with technical guides and articles. Beside he's website, Netanel is also writing a Hebrew weblog at Microsoft Israel's blogging community.

  • How to replace default Windows 7/Server 2008 R2 Recovery Environment in Diagnostic and Recovery Toolset

    Posted by Netanel Ben-Shushan on February 12 2010, 2:04 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Desktop Optimization Pack, Windows 7.

    By: Netanel Ben-Shushan, CSA/JNCIA-SSL/MCP/MCSA/MCSE/MCTS/MCITP

    Abstract

    This guide describes how to replace the default Windows Recovery Environment (RE) with a Diagnostic and Recovery Toolset version 6.5 (new version of Winternals ERD Commander).

     

    Introduction

    Microsoft has been developed a new version of ERD Commander from Winternals, which Microsoft acquired while ago; Named Diagnostic and Recovery Toolset, or DaRT for short.

    In order to replace Windows RE boot image with DaRT you'll need to use account with administrative privileges (member of the local Administrators group at least).

    It's recommended to replace the default Windows RE within DaRT for getting wide local troubleshooting toolset such as LockSmith for passwords reset, restoration utility, etc.

    In order to perform the replacement follows these steps:

     

    Preparing the field…

    1. Open Windows Explorer, click with Alt and choose Folder Options from the Tools menu.

    2. Choose Show hidden files, folders and drives and deselect Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) and Hide extensions for known file types.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_1

     

    3. Then click OK.

    4. Open C:\ Drive, right-click Recovery folder. Choose Properties from the menu.

    5. Select Security tab, and click on Edit.

    6. On the new windows, click on Add and find you user account, then click on OK.

    7. Assign Allow: Full Control permissions for the specific account and click on OK.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_2

     

    Now, as you can see the C:\Recovery folder is accessible to your user account.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_3

     

    At C:\Recovery\<UID> you'll find the Winre.wim image file. This is the Windows RE image that have been loaded every time you're choosing to repair your computer from the F8 startup menu.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_4

     

    Creating ERD Commander ISO Image

    1. Install DaRT 6.5 from Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack 2009 R2 (available to customers with active Software Assurance license) on your computer or on computer with DVD burner.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_5

     

    2. Open ERD Commander Boot Media Wizard from the Windows menu and follow these steps to create ERD ISO image:

    2.1. On the welcome screen click Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_6

     

    2.2. Insert and navigate to Windows 7/Server 2008 R2 media and click Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_7

     

    2.3. On the Preparing files screen click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_8

     

    2.4. Select or exclude the tools that will be included in your ERD image and click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_9

     

    2.5. Locate the Windows Debugging tools and click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_10

     

    2.6. Choose if you want to update your ERD's system sweeper and click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_11

     

    2.7. If you want to add additional drivers, click on Add. Then click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_12

     

    2.8. On the Additional Files click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_13

     

    Note: You can add useful applications and files to your ERD ISO image such as disk imaging utility, corporate antivirus, etc.

     

    2.9. To create the ISO image click on Next.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_14

     

    2.10. If you want to burn the ISO into a media set the wizard to your media burner. Click on Next to proceed.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_15

     

    2.11. Click on Finish.

     

    change_winre_with_dart_16

     

    3. On the ISO navigate to the Sources directory; inside X:\Sources (when X: is the CD driver letter) you'll find boot.wim image.

    4. Copy boot.wim into C:\Recovery\<UID>\ and change the file name to Winre.wim.

    Note: It's recommended to rename the original Winre.wim file name to Winre.wim.old or delete it from the C:\Recovery directory.

     

    Next time you'll restart your computer and choose Repair your computer you'll notice that DaRT has been added to the Windows RE menu (and there's also network support at the start of Windows RE).

     

    change_winre_with_dart_17

     

    Note: My personal recommendation is to deploy Windows 7/Server 2008 R2 with a built-in DaRT recovery environment support.

    Note that you will need an active Software Assurance (SA) license to each OS that deployed with DaRT.

    Summary

    This guide described how to create ERD ISO image by using Diagnostic and Recovery Toolset and then replacing the default Windows RE boot image with DaRT boot image on Windows 7 & Server 2008 R2.

    About the author

    Netanel Ben-Shushan is an IT Consultant & Trainer from Israel, who works mainly with Microsoft, networking and information security systems. He's the creator of www.ben-shushan.net, a personal website in Hebrew with technical guides and articles. Beside he's website, Netanel is also writing a Hebrew weblog at Microsoft Israel's blogging community.

  • ROI whitepaper on Windows Server 2008 R2

    Posted by bink on November 9 2009, 8:04 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows 2008 R2.

    In August 2009, Microsoft commissioned Forrester Consulting to examine the total economic impact and potential return on investment (ROI) that enterprises may realize by deploying Windows Server 2008 R2.

    Windows Server 2008 R2 is the newest Windows Server operating system from Microsoft. To understand the financial impact of deploying Windows Server 2008 R2, Forrester conducted indepth interviews with nine actual Microsoft customers. These organizations were all Microsoft TAP customers who are early adopters of Windows Server 2008 R2. Forrester then compiled the results from these interviews into a composite case study of a North American retail and distribution organization of 1,500 employees and $450 million in annual revenue.

    Download details WS08 Whitepapers

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition x64 (Full Install) VHD

    Posted by sumeethevans on November 4 2009, 5:37 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008.

    The Microsoft VHD Test Drive Program provides customers a flexible, extensible and supported evaluation experience requiring minimal hardware and IT overhead. You can access the catalog of pre-configured Microsoft solutions in VHD format for test, evaluation, demonstration, training & education and proof of concept from www.microsoft.com/vhd. This download helps you evaluate the new features of Windows Server 2008 R2. You’ll have the opportunity to try new and improved features and functionality of Windows Server 2008 R2 free for 180 days. Windows Server 2008 R2 builds on the award-winning foundation of Windows Server 2008, expanding existing technology and adding new features to enable IT professionals to increase the reliability and flexibility of their server infrastructures. New virtualization tools, Web resources, management enhancements, and exciting Windows 7 integration help save time, reduce costs, and provide a platform for a dynamic and efficiently managed data center. Powerful tools such as Internet Information Services (IIS) version 7.5, updated Server Manager and Hyper-V platforms and Windows PowerShell version 2.0 combine to give customers greater control, increased efficiency and the ability to react to front-line business needs faster than ever before. To find out more about Windows Server 2008 R2, please visit the product homepage. Please note that this product is available for evaluation purposes only and should not be used in a production environment. This is a preconfigured virtual machine set contained within the Virtual Hard Disk (VHD) format. Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V, Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008, or the R2 versions of these products is required to use this virtual machine. Please refer to the system requirements section for more details.

    Download At Source

  • Infrastructure Planning and Design Guide for Windows Deployment Services— Now Updated for Windows Server 2008 R2

    Posted by sumeethevans on October 7 2009, 3:45 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows 2008 R2.

    The Infrastructure Planning and Design Guide for Windows® Deployment Services, updated to reflect the new features and functionality introduced with Windows Server 2008 R2, outlines the critical infrastructure design elements that are crucial to a successful implementation of Windows Deployment Services. Following the six steps in this guide will result in a design that is sized, configured, and appropriately placed to enable rapid deployment of Windows operating systems, while also considering the performance, capacity, and fault tolerance of the system.

    Take advantage of the benefits IPD Guides provide:

    · Acceleration the infrastructure design process. · Best practice design guidance from the product group. · Infrastructure optimization for best meeting business requirements.

    Download the updated IPD Guide for Windows Deployment Services.

  • Web Deployment Tool

    Posted by sumeethevans on September 30 2009, 12:19 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008.

    The Web Deployment Tool simplifies migration, management and deployment of IIS Web servers, Web applications and Web sites.

    The Web Deployment Tool simplifies the migration, management and deployment of IIS Web servers, Web applications and Web sites. Administrators can use command-line scripting with the Web Deployment Tool to synchronize IIS 6.0 and IIS 7.0 servers or to migrate an IIS 6.0 server to IIS 7.0. The Web Deployment Tool also enables administrators and delegated users to use IIS Manager to deploy ASP.NET and PHP applications to an IIS 7.0 server. Migrate Web applications between IIS 6.0 and IIS 7.0 with ease Simplify the planning of your IIS 6.0 to IIS 7.0 migrations by determining incompatibilities and previewing the proposed changes before starting the process. Learning about any potential issues in advance gives you the chance to take corrective measures and simplifies migration. Synchronize your server farm efficiently The Web Deployment Tool allows you to efficiently synchronize sites, applications or servers across your IIS 7.0 server farm by detecting differences between the source and destination content and transferring only those changes which need synchronization. The tool simplifies the synchronization process by automatically determining the configuration, content, databases and certificates to be synchronized for a specific site. In addition to the default behavior, you still have the option to specify additional providers for the synchronization, including COM, GAC and registry settings. Package, archive and deploy Web applications more easily The Web Deployment Tool enables you to package configuration and content of your installed Web applications, including SQL databases, and use the packages for storage or redeployment. These packages can be deployed using IIS Manager without requiring administrative privileges. The tool also integrates with Visual Studio 2010 to help developers streamline the deployment of Web applications to the Web server.

    Download: Web Deployment Tool (x86)                 Web Deployment Tool (x64)